Where We Are … Lansing CC

We have heard the same type of ‘statistics’ cited as evidence that developmental mathematics is a failure.  “Too many students place into remedial mathematics” … “remedial mathematics blocks students from completing a college math course” … and similar data mcnuggets.

Here at Lansing CC, we are working on a different narrative, with a story of student success within a department willing to make fundamental changes because we think those changes will result in a better experience for our students — as opposed to ‘because the state (or chancellor) told us we had to’.

Here is a representation of the progress we have made:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Source:  Lansing CC Center for Data Science, Feb 2018

 

This chart is showing the proportion of students enrolled in credit level mathematics out of the total (including developmental).  Within 5 years, we have doubled the rate of students taking credit math courses.

Here is a chart of our basic curriculum:

 

 

 

 

The progress is the result of several changes and decisions:

  • Eliminating pre-algebra as a course
  • Replacing beginning algebra with math literacy
  • Using math literacy as the prerequisite to the quantitative reasoning (QR) and statistics courses
  • Removing intermediate algebra from the list of general education courses for an associate degree

The only co-requisite work involved (so far) is within developmental courses (Math Lit with Review; Fast Track Algebra).

Another piece of good news is that we have slightly more students in the initial STEM path courses (college algebra & pre-calculus) than we do in the QR and statistics courses.

Early in April, I will be delivering an AMATYC Webinar on “Dev Math: Past, Present, and Future”.  In that webinar, the conclusion will be some thoughts on what a brighter future could be for us … including a specific vision for the curriculum in the first two years.  I hope you will consider being a part of that webinar (tentatively scheduled for April 3, afternoon).

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